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Who’s Really Winning The Search War?

Ask any search marketer what Google's market share is, and they'll likely say around 66%. That's the stat comScore has long supplied. Contributor Eli Schwartz asks whether it's really accurate.

Yandex Announces Third Quarter 2014 Financial Results

MOSCOW and AMSTERDAM, Netherlands --Yandex , one of Europe's largest internet companies and the leading search provider in Russia, today announced its financial results for the third quarter ended September ...

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Install Blekko Toolbar For Refined Search Results

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Try Blekko for Meaningful and Relevant Search Experience

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Install Blekko Toolbar For Refined Search Results

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You can always Count on the Blekko Search Engine for Spam Free Results

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Top 5 Worst Search Engines That Didnt Make It

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Questions About Blekko on Quora

Questions About Blekko

reddit.com: search results

Is DuckDucKGo The Future of Search or Why Unpersonalized Search Grows in Popularity

Highly personalized search is one of the key services that Google takes pride in offering to its users. Even though Yahoo and Bing are lagging behind, they try to follow Google’s lead in improving their custom search results too. The constant improvement of the personalized search has definitely facilitated countless people. However, it seems that a significant number of online users has decided against giving away their personal data and have opted for a less intrusive web search alternative.

What is personalized search?

Personalized search presents us with results that are tailored not only to our search terms but to our specific character as deduced by the search engine. Thus each person faces different information suggestions depending on whether he conducts a search on his own or on his friend’s PC. Basically the personalized search presents you with:

  • A list of recommended websites that save from answering to your query would also try to be consistent with your past searches and website selections.
  • A list of recommend local venues that would adhere to yours and your friends’ online reviews.
  • Local specific data based on your current location, etc.

What’s wrong with that?

Personalized search is often perceived as a true facilitator, however one should not forget that usually every coin has two sides – the same rule applies here. The challenges that personalized search poses before us include:

  • Being trapped in an artificial ‘filter bubble’ where the “intelligent” search engine of our choice decides what we need to see. Under the personalized search our choices are limited to the familiar sources that we have previously demonstrated interest in by recommending, sharing, or simply clicking and selecting them before the rest. Thus in the sea of information that is available on the web we remain blind to all the alternatives, we are stuck with the choices that the engine thinks relevant to our taste, interests, character. We live in our own filter bubble as Eli Pariser explains, but what is the most unsettling of it all – we don’t even realize it.
  • Being an easy target to advertisers Monitoring and keeping a record of our search history, the search engines make us a target of web ads that follow us everywhere on the web. Having compiled all the personal data like purchasing records, search queries, frequently visited websites, preferred news stories or even time spent on the site and pages skimmed through during your visit, the search engines offer a valuable resource to advertisers, who pay to be able to use it and snowball you with “targeted” ads.
  • Your search history is used for legal purposes Having a personal profile drafted at the given search engine your search history is kept on record and in case the government or a legal practitioner requires it, the search engine will immediately render the information.

How Is Unpersonalized Search Different?

  • You are not presented with a biased choice of articles that your friends have recommended.
  • Your IP is not being tracked, neither is your search history.
  • Your profile is not sold, because you simply do not have a profile when using unpersonalized search.
  • 3rd party advertisers and other parties are not able to build profiles about you in order to serve targeted ads, so your SERPs are not flooded with commercials.
  • Your Searches cannot be legally requested.

Why unpersonalized search engine like DuckDuckGo is quickly gaining popularity?

As Greg Kumparak explains DDG is still small to compare to a search engine giant like Google with its modest 1 billion searches for the year 2013. In order to make a simple comparison he draws our attention to Google’s searches for 2012 – they amount to “3.2 billion searches, or roughly 3X all of DuckDuckGo’s annual traffic, each day.” Nevertheless, DDG’s popularity marks an amazing rise for the past year and its users grow by the day. It attracts investments and partners that believe in the respect for privacy that the engine promotes by not using tracking cookies and not saving a record of its users’ IPs.

DuckDuckGo’s CEO and founder Gabriel Weinberg has openly stated that he has no interest in keeping or even collecting its visitors’ search history. Instead the search engine monetizes its services the same way Google does (showing ads triggered by the search term used) but without tracking its users.

Interesting result of this anti personalized search algorithm is the uniformity of results available to all of DDG’s users. Thus a specific search term triggers the same set of results for everyone regardless of search history and supposed interests. This provides unbiased information rendering that avoids the so-called filter bubble scenario.

Being more of a search engine aggregator DDG has a unique strategy for selecting its information sources. Unlike Google, DDG deletes the “search results for companies he believes are content mills”. Thus, while in Google’s top search results one often recognizes articles from eHow, DDG would never recommend them, as their thousands of daily posts submitted by paid freelancers are characterized as “…low-quality content designed specifically to rank highly in Google’s search index.”

The search mechanism of DDG actually aggregates the crawled results of several search engines like Bing, Yahoo, Yandex, Blekko, WolframAlpha, and many others. And while DDG does not invest time and efforts in web crawling itself, it focuses on its users’ privacy, positive experience, spam free results, and its own instant answers. It gathers the results from various sources, choosing the best vertical search engine on a given topic, while also reassembling and matching the results with the ones rendered by its private crawler –DuckDuckBot, and a number of crowd-sourced sites like Wikipedia.

DDG might just be the next step in the search industry and if it is early to be labeled as the future of search, it surely has a modern note to it that addresses the latest hot topic – about one’s right to privacy.

Nowadays the attempt to protect one’s personal information has lead to a lot of breakthroughs in technology. Take for instance how our currency has been changing throughout the recent years the modern virtual payment options like bitcoins promote lower transaction costs, immunity to inflation, and above all – anonymity. Privacy in web search is yet another rising need of the online users that alternative search engines like DuckDuckGo have proven to be able to address.

What do you guys think???

Source: http://optilocal.org/unpersonalized-search-grows-in-popularity-is-duckduckgo-the-future-of-search/

submitted by OptiLocal to marketing
[link] [3 comments]

Posted on 31 March 2014

Why Unpersonalized Search Grows in Popularity – Is DuckDucKGo The Future of Search

Highly personalized search is one of the key services that Google takes pride in offering to its users. Even though Yahoo and Bing are lagging behind, they try to follow Google’s lead in improving their custom search results too. The constant improvement of the personalized search has definitely facilitated countless people. However, it seems that a significant number of online users has decided against giving away their personal data and have opted for a less intrusive web search alternative.

What is personalized search?

Personalized search presents us with results that are tailored not only to our search terms but to our specific character as deduced by the search engine. Thus each person faces different information suggestions depending on whether he conducts a search on his own or on his friend’s PC. Basically the personalized search presents you with:

  • A list of recommended websites that save from answering to your query would also try to be consistent with your past searches and website selections.
  • A list of recommend local venues that would adhere to yours and your friends’ online reviews.
  • Local specific data based on your current location, etc.

What’s wrong with that?

Personalized search is often perceived as a true facilitator, however one should not forget that usually every coin has two sides – the same rule applies here. The challenges that personalized search poses before us include:

  • Being trapped in an artificial ‘filter bubble’ where the “intelligent” search engine of our choice decides what we need to see. Under the personalized search our choices are limited to the familiar sources that we have previously demonstrated interest in by recommending, sharing, or simply clicking and selecting them before the rest. Thus in the sea of information that is available on the web we remain blind to all the alternatives, we are stuck with the choices that the engine thinks relevant to our taste, interests, character. We live in our own filter bubble as Eli Pariser explains, but what is the most unsettling of it all – we don’t even realize it.
  • Being an easy target to advertisers Monitoring and keeping a record of our search history, the search engines make us a target of web ads that follow us everywhere on the web. Having compiled all the personal data like purchasing records, search queries, frequently visited websites, preferred news stories or even time spent on the site and pages skimmed through during your visit, the search engines offer a valuable resource to advertisers, who pay to be able to use it and snowball you with “targeted” ads.
  • Your search history is used for legal purposes Having a personal profile drafted at the given search engine your search history is kept on record and in case the government or a legal practitioner requires it, the search engine will immediately render the information.

How Is Unpersonalized Search Different?

  • You are not presented with a biased choice of articles that your friends have recommended.
  • Your IP is not being tracked, neither is your search history.
  • Your profile is not sold, because you simply do not have a profile when using unpersonalized search.
  • 3rd party advertisers and other parties are not able to build profiles about you in order to serve targeted ads, so your SERPs are not flooded with commercials.
  • Your Searches cannot be legally requested.

Why unpersonalized search engine like DuckDuckGo is quickly gaining popularity?

As Greg Kumparak explains DDG is still small to compare to a search engine giant like Google with its modest 1 billion searches for the year 2013. In order to make a simple comparison he draws our attention to Google’s searches for 2012 – they amount to “3.2 billion searches, or roughly 3X all of DuckDuckGo’s annual traffic, each day.” Nevertheless, DDG’s popularity marks an amazing rise for the past year and its users grow by the day. It attracts investments and partners that believe in the respect for privacy that the engine promotes by not using tracking cookies and not saving a record of its users’ IPs.

DuckDuckGo’s CEO and founder Gabriel Weinberg has openly stated that he has no interest in keeping or even collecting its visitors’ search history. Instead the search engine monetizes its services the same way Google does (showing ads triggered by the search term used) but without tracking its users.

Interesting result of this anti personalized search algorithm is the uniformity of results available to all of DDG’s users. Thus a specific search term triggers the same set of results for everyone regardless of search history and supposed interests. This provides unbiased information rendering that avoids the so-called filter bubble scenario.

Being more of a search engine aggregator DDG has a unique strategy for selecting its information sources. Unlike Google, DDG deletes the “search results for companies he believes are content mills”. Thus, while in Google’s top search results one often recognizes articles from eHow, DDG would never recommend them, as their thousands of daily posts submitted by paid freelancers are characterized as “…low-quality content designed specifically to rank highly in Google’s search index.”

The search mechanism of DDG actually aggregates the crawled results of several search engines like Bing, Yahoo, Yandex, Blekko, WolframAlpha, and many others. And while DDG does not invest time and efforts in web crawling itself, it focuses on its users’ privacy, positive experience, spam free results, and its own instant answers. It gathers the results from various sources, choosing the best vertical search engine on a given topic, while also reassembling and matching the results with the ones rendered by its private crawler –DuckDuckBot, and a number of crowd-sourced sites like Wikipedia.

DDG might just be the next step in the search industry and if it is early to be labeled as the future of search, it surely has a modern note to it that addresses the latest hot topic – about one’s right to privacy.

Nowadays the attempt to protect one’s personal information has lead to a lot of breakthroughs in technology. Take for instance how our currency has been changing throughout the recent years the modern virtual payment options like bitcoins promote lower transaction costs, immunity to inflation, and above all – anonymity. Privacy in web search is yet another rising need of the online users that alternative search engines like DuckDuckGo have proven to be able to address.

What do you guys think???

Source: http://optilocal.org/unpersonalized-search-grows-in-popularity-is-duckduckgo-the-future-of-search/

submitted by OptiLocal to SEO
[link] [9 comments]

Posted on 31 March 2014

Trying to find a photo

I've been googling around and haven't found it. I've even tried searching on blekko and duckduckgo... nothing

There's a picture with two scenarios, side by side: one where a woman has a gun and another where she does not. On the picture with the gun, she's defending herself with it. On the picture with out the gun, she has her arms up, trying to protect herself from getting beat-up. Has anyone seen this?

submitted by happycrabeatsthefish to progun
[link] [3 comments]

Posted on 25 February 2014

Help understanding a significant data discrepancy between Web Server logs & Analytics

Hey there,

I hope some of you can help with understanding a significant data discrepancy (29%) in comparing our SEO visits obtained from varnish logs vs Analytics Organic visits.

We expect there to be a sizable difference in both sets of data, as we don't know - the inner workings of analytics - our differences in dealing with pre requests, - what Google consider to be search engines - how analytics manage bot traffic & traffic that has a high percentage chance of being bot traffic

The Varnish logs are huge (millions of visits per day). So we had to initially filter these to remove known & probable bot traffic. Detecting bots is pretty difficult (though we have a long list to work from), so this is most likely one of the significant sources of extra traffic. We can assume, it's unlikely make up the full 29%.

We factored in session id's too, so that only one visit is counted per session whilst filtering out those with just one page request as these are likely to be crawlers. The next step was to identify other verticals, such as paid, mail, social, referral & server requests (particularly from email).

We then categorized referral sources we considered to be SEO:

%bahdal.com%' %baidu.com%' %blekko.com%' %duckduckgo.com%' %bablyon.com%' %snapdo.com%' %avfirm.com%' %peekyou.com%' %yandex.ru%' %search.conduit.com%' %searchmobileonline.com%' %isearch.avg.com%' %static.flipora.com%' %search.mywebsearch.com%' %google%' %bing%' %yahoo%'

(there are a few more)

Then subtracted sources which are known to not be Organic traffic:

%accounts.google.com%' %mail %' %googleads%' %/uds/afs%' %/aclk%' %cse?%' %ogskillid%' %signedparameters=%' %/vetjob?jobid%' %picture=size90%' %ogaction%' %emaillanding_invitecontact%' %medium=facebook%' %ask.com%'

(I've removed a few for the purposes of this report)

submitted by Cocopoppyhead to SEO
[link] [9 comments]

Posted on 28 November 2013

Stephen King's Pee Fetish and the Google Coverup

idiosyncopatic: original reddit link


I have read many (but not all) Stephen King books, and I have noticed a rather strange thing. It seems like in most all of his books at least one character pees. Now, most times it's an involuntary reaction out of fear, but there are also several normal peeing scenes. Now, this tends to stick in your head. I get it: losing conrol of your bladder is a vivid way to show terror; the fear must be intense to lose control of such a basic primal function. I do not have each reference listed, but I am thinking about rereading his books and making a refernce table. Please forgive my lack of sources for the moment. This sounds strange, but it's so frequent (pun intended) that when it DOESN'T happen, it's surprising. I have told a few people about this theory, only to get some crazy looks, but I since started reading the Shining and got very excited when on page pg 32 (kindle edition) Danny "smell[s] his own urine as he [voids] hemself in the extremity of his terror." I had never read this book before! But I was able to guess based on past experience. Now you explain to me how Google and Bing searches have turned up nothing. Rather strange, considering that (as Reddit tends to prove) no idea is original. How could it possibly be that NO ONE ELSE has noticed this? Simple: Stephen King is a rich man. He or his publishing company has paid off the search engines. How else could this happen. To test my theory I used an alternative search engine (blekko.com) THE FIRST RESULT is a forum entry on peesearch.com. here is the link to the discussion: http://www.peesearch.net/community/forums/archive/index.php/t-33725.html

SAY WHATT?????

You may cry "safesearch" results, but I am an adult woman and I don't need no stinking safesearch. That option is turned OFF in my settings.

What do you think? Mere coincidence by an overly-excited far? OR COVERUP?

If anyone is interested I will add some screenshots for proof.


Discourse level: 28%

Shills: 0%

submitted by funnymanisi to conspiro
[link] [7 comments]

Posted on 26 October 2013

Stephen King's Pee Fetish and the Google Coverup

I have read many (but not all) Stephen King books, and I have noticed a rather strange thing. It seems like in most all of his books at least one character pees. Now, most times it's an involuntary reaction out of fear, but there are also several normal peeing scenes. Now, this tends to stick in your head. I get it: losing conrol of your bladder is a vivid way to show terror; the fear must be intense to lose control of such a basic primal function. I do not have each reference listed, but I am thinking about rereading his books and making a refernce table. Please forgive my lack of sources for the moment. This sounds strange, but it's so frequent (pun intended) that when it DOESN'T happen, it's surprising. I have told a few people about this theory, only to get some crazy looks, but I since started reading the Shining and got very excited when on page pg 32 (kindle edition) Danny "smell[s] his own urine as he [voids] hemself in the extremity of his terror." I had never read this book before! But I was able to guess based on past experience. Now you explain to me how Google and Bing searches have turned up nothing. Rather strange, considering that (as Reddit tends to prove) no idea is original. How could it possibly be that NO ONE ELSE has noticed this? Simple: Stephen King is a rich man. He or his publishing company has paid off the search engines. How else could this happen. To test my theory I used an alternative search engine (blekko.com) THE FIRST RESULT is a forum entry on peesearch.com. here is the link to the discussion: http://www.peesearch.net/community/forums/archive/index.php/t-33725.html

SAY WHATT?????

You may cry "safesearch" results, but I am an adult woman and I don't need no stinking safesearch. That option is turned OFF in my settings.

What do you think? Mere coincidence by an overly-excited far? OR COVERUP?

If anyone is interested I will add some screenshots for proof.

submitted by idiosyncopatic to conspiracy
[link] [6 comments]

Posted on 26 October 2013

Ad-aware acting like adware- forced blekko search

Just got a new laptop for my father in law. So was getting the normal protection when noticed that Ad-aware changed my home page and keyword URL search goes through lavasoft.blekko.com . In firefox tried to change keyword URL but ever restart moves it back to the lavasoft default. Uninstalled Ad-aware and what ever fancy search bars, but it still forces me to use blekko. Why is this program acting like the programs it should be protecting us from?

submitted by chuloreddit to techsupport
[link] [1 comment]

Posted on 26 February 2013

Adaware free antiviris changed my default search engine even when I said "no" to toolbar installation.

Just a heads up... I received a prompt a few days ago to update the free version of adaware's antiviris software.

During the install, I made sure to untick the install extra toolbars and software buttons, yet when I tried to do a google search this morning, my browser's default search had been changed to blekko.

It's time for a new antiviris program.

submitted by anagrama to software
[link] [3 comments]

Posted on 29 November 2012

I think my PC might be infected

Hello,

There are several odd processes running on my PC. They have no description or username data. When I click "properties" or "open file location," nothing pops up. These are,

csrss.exe winlogon.exe atieclxx.exe 

screenshot

I realize that the former two are typical windows files and that the third is related to my ATI card, but I haven't seen these running before - or perhaps I have, but with a description and user data. I've heard that some types of malware pose as these processes.

Recently, I've noticed huge spikes in CPU usage (often reaching 100% and constant use of upwards of 50% of my computer's memory (although I have 3-4 Gb RAM, and my only memory intensive programs are Chrome / Skype / Steam). When I put my computer in sleep mode and turn it on again, sometimes the machine will turn on, the LEDs on my mouse/keyboard will turn on, the monitor remains unresponsive and the CPU light doesn't flicker. I forced shutdown once, and received a BSOD. When I rebooted, I didn't see a typical login screen - after the boot screen disappeared, the screen remained dark for 45 seconds, and suddenly showed my desktop as it was when I put my computer in sleep mode.

I've run scans in Malwarebytes, AVG and Microsoft Security Essentials in safe mode and found nothing in AVG/MSE. However, Malwarebytes found some spyware, which was deleted. However, I still notice these spikes in CPU / Memory usage, and the three processes are still listed and running. After a few searches, this seemed similar, but I haven't noticed any spam, except for Google Chrome changing my search engine from Google to Blekko -- however, this may have been a default process of one of the anti-malware softwares I've downloaded. But I am not entirely faithful that that's the case.

If you have any tips / suggestions / instructions / words of advice, I'm all ears. Thank you in advance for your help.

submitted by HideousInfant to techsupport
[link] [5 comments]

Posted on 12 February 2012