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Blekko - Yahoo News Search Results

Blekko Shuts Down, Becomes Part Of IBM Watson

Back in 2010, an alternative search engine called Blekko emerged. It came from Rich Skrenta, co-founder & former CEO of Topix and NewHoo (which went on to become The Open Directory Project or DMOZ). It aimed to crowd source search …

IBM acquires technology from curated search engine Blekko to bolster Watson

Blekko, the curated search engine, has been quiet over the last two years. Until Friday, the company hadn’t tweeted since December 2013 and there hasn’t been much more activity on its Facebook page over that time either. On Friday, the … Continue reading →

The story behind the first computer viruses ever

When we think about computer viruses, one tends to think about Windows or perhaps cross-platform malware that comes from visiting questionable websites. But truth be told, computer viruses have a long and storied history, both on the PC and Apple side of the equation. To be fair, most of the earlier computer viruses weren’t terribly dangerous. If anything, they were more often than not proof-of ...

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Blekko-Slash The Web: Blekko makes use of Both Human Expertise and Automated Software - StumbleUpon

Posted on 12 January 2015

webdirectoryforum.org

Posted on 27 December 2014

Blekko Focuses on Local Hits and Enables Refined Search

Posted on 3 December 2014

blekko

Posted on 24 October 2014

Blekko Announces More Innovations to Make Search Meaningful and Relevant

Posted on 5 May 2014

Experience Enhanced Search Experience with Blekko

Posted on 15 April 2014

Blekko: Your Web Browsing Is About To Change Forever

Posted on 14 April 2014

Blekko Provides Comprehensive Protection from Spam

Posted on 31 March 2014

Get Rid of Shady Results by Using Blekko

Posted on 4 March 2014

Get Rid of Shady Results by Using Blekko

Posted on 4 March 2014

Top Answers About Blekko on Quora

Top Answers About Blekko on Quora

Why are there so few search startups founded by former Google employees?


Many Googlers (current or former) believe that (1) Google's leadership position in search is impregnable and (2) there aren't exciting search products that have a good chance of getting traction.

By the way, the evidence seems to support this. What search startups have been very successful? Cuil, Powerset... I can't think of a search startup in the past 5-8 years that has broken out.

When you come out of a company like Google, you frequently want to start a business in a totally different category.

You don't see ex-Facebook people building social networks, or Tony Faddell starting a new phone company.

See Questions On Quora

Posted on 12 September 2014

What is it like to work on blekko's Core Relevance and Ranking team?


One of blekko's unique qualities as an upstart search engine is that we have our own multi-billion webpage crawl and index. This puts is in the league of big players like Google and Bing -- in fact the entire list of search engines that have their own big index is Blekko, Google, Bing, Yandex, and Baidu.

As a small company, our entire company is outnumbered several times over by Google's core relevance and ranking team. And we have to do things like maintain our own NoSQL database, crawler, infrastructure, etc. As you might imagine, this means that our relevance and ranking uses a lot of machine learning, and we also emphasize our human-generated curation of websites into topic categories. We handle about 5 million queries per day, which gives us a modest amount of click data to work with. At the end of the day, the main reason that we can be competitive at all is our use of human curation, which the other players don't want to do.

So, what's it like to work on the team? Compared to working on a much bigger team that's already done a lot more work, at blekko you would have a lot more opportunity to work on fundamental things that are already mostly solved elsewhere. And you have the opportunity to blaze a new trail with our human curation data, although we've already done a lot of work there.

See Questions On Quora

Posted on 6 August 2013

Why are hyperlinks green on search engine results pages?


We joke about this "10 blue links" thing over at blekko. It turns out that if you A/B test various color schemes, the one that performs the best has the webpage title in blue and the url in green. 5 years ago, when we started, if you looked at the search results page for bing, yahoo, and google, the body of the page looked nearly identical for all 3. We wanted to be different, but our users want blue titles and green urls. Oh well!

See Questions On Quora

Posted on 3 September 2012

Can Blekko survive even if it doesn't attract mainstream users beyond geeks?


It turns out that we have quite a lot of "mainstream" users: About 29% of non-navigational queries automatically invoke a slashtag, which gets rid of spam and boosts relevance. This is usable by everyone, not just people who are interested in doing something extra.

Try it out for yourself!

  • Cash back credit card: https://blekko.com/ws/cash+back+... -- other search engines send you to sales websites, while blekko sends you to sites that aren't selling you something.
  • Cure for headaches: https://blekko.com/ws/cure+for+h... -- other search engines send you to various dubious places, while blekko sends you to doctor-written websites.
  • Industrial design colleges: https://blekko.com/ws/industrial... -- other search engines send you to "lead gen" websites trying to make money referring you to actual colleges, while blekko sends you to actual college websites.

(This question was asked around our launch in Nov 2010, but I just got asked to answer, so I thought I'd update everyone with what actually happened.)

See Questions On Quora

Posted on 17 May 2012

How did Cuil and Blekko build such large indexes of the web, despite being small startups?


blekko bought a whole bunch of servers, wrote our own NoSQL database, and crawled and indexed billions of pages. It's a lot of work, which is why most search engine startups use someone else's crawl and index. (Currently, the only search engines crawling/indexing billions of pages globally are Google, Bing/Yahoo, blekko, and Yandex.)

When we launched in November 2010, we had 700 servers. We currently have 1,500.

If I remember correctly, Cuil raised a similar amount of $$ as blekko, and had around the same number of servers.

See Questions On Quora

Posted on 16 April 2012

Why do some of the more popular search engines like Google, Bing, Blekko and Duck Duck Go have such weird names?


Indeed - Bing was designed to be short and memorable.  It was also meant to sound friendly and fun.  Ideally we wanted something you could type with one hand but that didn't work out.  Also the onomatopoeic comment is right: we wanted it to remind you of that sound in your head when you get something - "Bing!  I've got it!".

See Questions On Quora

Posted on 25 January 2011

reddit.com: search results

Stor tips- & länksamling till träning inför HÖGSKOLEPROVET! (Bidra med egna tips)

Aktiviten på denna subreddit är i stort sett noll så jag tyckte det var dags att dra igång forumet ordentligt! Här är mina tips och länkar inför högskoleprovet, dela gärna med er av era egna tips så fyller jag på dem i mitt inlägg.


Tips och information inför Högskoleprovet!


Info

  • hogskoleprov.nu - Anmälan till högskoleprovet, se dina tidigare resultat och kommande provdatum.
  • studera.nu - Info om provet, högskolan, normeringstabeller etc.
  • antagning.se - Anmälan till utbildning, info om högskola/universitet.
  • statistik.uhr.se - Antagningsstatistik för universitet och högskolor i Sverige.

Ordträning

  • Memrise - Träna ordkunskap med djup inlärning, tidskrävande men effektivt!
    - Ordlista: Hp-ord - 2500 svåra svenska ord.
    - Ordlista: Högskoleprov-ORD - 5800 svåra svenska ord.
    - Ordlista: Morfem - Bra lista för att lära sig prefix och suffix.
  • Ordprov - Hämta ordlistor eller träna ord i spelet ordkaos!
  • Blekko ordprov - Ordprov med ordprov.se's ordlistor.
  • Prefix - Wikipedia-lista med prefix.
  • Suffix - Wikipedia-lista med suffix.

Svensk lästräning


Engelsk lästräning


Matematik


Böcker


Appar


Övrigt

  • Hpguiden.se - Förbättra ditt resultat på HP ännu mer med deras VIP-tjänst.
  • Studera vidare - Gör gamla högskoleprov direkt i webbläsaren eller ladda hem och skriv ut, prov från 93-2014.
  • Provtips.com - Info om provet, provdagen och tips för att skriva ett så bra prov som möjligt.
  • Flashback-tråd - Diskussion på flashback kring Högskoleprovet.
submitted by LaudonIS to hogskoleprovet
[link] [21 comments]

Posted on 1 August 2015

Is DuckDucKGo The Future of Search or Why Unpersonalized Search Grows in Popularity

Highly personalized search is one of the key services that Google takes pride in offering to its users. Even though Yahoo and Bing are lagging behind, they try to follow Google’s lead in improving their custom search results too. The constant improvement of the personalized search has definitely facilitated countless people. However, it seems that a significant number of online users has decided against giving away their personal data and have opted for a less intrusive web search alternative.

What is personalized search?

Personalized search presents us with results that are tailored not only to our search terms but to our specific character as deduced by the search engine. Thus each person faces different information suggestions depending on whether he conducts a search on his own or on his friend’s PC. Basically the personalized search presents you with:

  • A list of recommended websites that save from answering to your query would also try to be consistent with your past searches and website selections.
  • A list of recommend local venues that would adhere to yours and your friends’ online reviews.
  • Local specific data based on your current location, etc.

What’s wrong with that?

Personalized search is often perceived as a true facilitator, however one should not forget that usually every coin has two sides – the same rule applies here. The challenges that personalized search poses before us include:

  • Being trapped in an artificial ‘filter bubble’ where the “intelligent” search engine of our choice decides what we need to see. Under the personalized search our choices are limited to the familiar sources that we have previously demonstrated interest in by recommending, sharing, or simply clicking and selecting them before the rest. Thus in the sea of information that is available on the web we remain blind to all the alternatives, we are stuck with the choices that the engine thinks relevant to our taste, interests, character. We live in our own filter bubble as Eli Pariser explains, but what is the most unsettling of it all – we don’t even realize it.
  • Being an easy target to advertisers Monitoring and keeping a record of our search history, the search engines make us a target of web ads that follow us everywhere on the web. Having compiled all the personal data like purchasing records, search queries, frequently visited websites, preferred news stories or even time spent on the site and pages skimmed through during your visit, the search engines offer a valuable resource to advertisers, who pay to be able to use it and snowball you with “targeted” ads.
  • Your search history is used for legal purposes Having a personal profile drafted at the given search engine your search history is kept on record and in case the government or a legal practitioner requires it, the search engine will immediately render the information.

How Is Unpersonalized Search Different?

  • You are not presented with a biased choice of articles that your friends have recommended.
  • Your IP is not being tracked, neither is your search history.
  • Your profile is not sold, because you simply do not have a profile when using unpersonalized search.
  • 3rd party advertisers and other parties are not able to build profiles about you in order to serve targeted ads, so your SERPs are not flooded with commercials.
  • Your Searches cannot be legally requested.

Why unpersonalized search engine like DuckDuckGo is quickly gaining popularity?

As Greg Kumparak explains DDG is still small to compare to a search engine giant like Google with its modest 1 billion searches for the year 2013. In order to make a simple comparison he draws our attention to Google’s searches for 2012 – they amount to “3.2 billion searches, or roughly 3X all of DuckDuckGo’s annual traffic, each day.” Nevertheless, DDG’s popularity marks an amazing rise for the past year and its users grow by the day. It attracts investments and partners that believe in the respect for privacy that the engine promotes by not using tracking cookies and not saving a record of its users’ IPs.

DuckDuckGo’s CEO and founder Gabriel Weinberg has openly stated that he has no interest in keeping or even collecting its visitors’ search history. Instead the search engine monetizes its services the same way Google does (showing ads triggered by the search term used) but without tracking its users.

Interesting result of this anti personalized search algorithm is the uniformity of results available to all of DDG’s users. Thus a specific search term triggers the same set of results for everyone regardless of search history and supposed interests. This provides unbiased information rendering that avoids the so-called filter bubble scenario.

Being more of a search engine aggregator DDG has a unique strategy for selecting its information sources. Unlike Google, DDG deletes the “search results for companies he believes are content mills”. Thus, while in Google’s top search results one often recognizes articles from eHow, DDG would never recommend them, as their thousands of daily posts submitted by paid freelancers are characterized as “…low-quality content designed specifically to rank highly in Google’s search index.”

The search mechanism of DDG actually aggregates the crawled results of several search engines like Bing, Yahoo, Yandex, Blekko, WolframAlpha, and many others. And while DDG does not invest time and efforts in web crawling itself, it focuses on its users’ privacy, positive experience, spam free results, and its own instant answers. It gathers the results from various sources, choosing the best vertical search engine on a given topic, while also reassembling and matching the results with the ones rendered by its private crawler –DuckDuckBot, and a number of crowd-sourced sites like Wikipedia.

DDG might just be the next step in the search industry and if it is early to be labeled as the future of search, it surely has a modern note to it that addresses the latest hot topic – about one’s right to privacy.

Nowadays the attempt to protect one’s personal information has lead to a lot of breakthroughs in technology. Take for instance how our currency has been changing throughout the recent years the modern virtual payment options like bitcoins promote lower transaction costs, immunity to inflation, and above all – anonymity. Privacy in web search is yet another rising need of the online users that alternative search engines like DuckDuckGo have proven to be able to address.

What do you guys think???

Source: http://optilocal.org/unpersonalized-search-grows-in-popularity-is-duckduckgo-the-future-of-search/

submitted by OptiLocal to marketing
[link] [3 comments]

Posted on 31 March 2014

Why Unpersonalized Search Grows in Popularity – Is DuckDucKGo The Future of Search

Highly personalized search is one of the key services that Google takes pride in offering to its users. Even though Yahoo and Bing are lagging behind, they try to follow Google’s lead in improving their custom search results too. The constant improvement of the personalized search has definitely facilitated countless people. However, it seems that a significant number of online users has decided against giving away their personal data and have opted for a less intrusive web search alternative.

What is personalized search?

Personalized search presents us with results that are tailored not only to our search terms but to our specific character as deduced by the search engine. Thus each person faces different information suggestions depending on whether he conducts a search on his own or on his friend’s PC. Basically the personalized search presents you with:

  • A list of recommended websites that save from answering to your query would also try to be consistent with your past searches and website selections.
  • A list of recommend local venues that would adhere to yours and your friends’ online reviews.
  • Local specific data based on your current location, etc.

What’s wrong with that?

Personalized search is often perceived as a true facilitator, however one should not forget that usually every coin has two sides – the same rule applies here. The challenges that personalized search poses before us include:

  • Being trapped in an artificial ‘filter bubble’ where the “intelligent” search engine of our choice decides what we need to see. Under the personalized search our choices are limited to the familiar sources that we have previously demonstrated interest in by recommending, sharing, or simply clicking and selecting them before the rest. Thus in the sea of information that is available on the web we remain blind to all the alternatives, we are stuck with the choices that the engine thinks relevant to our taste, interests, character. We live in our own filter bubble as Eli Pariser explains, but what is the most unsettling of it all – we don’t even realize it.
  • Being an easy target to advertisers Monitoring and keeping a record of our search history, the search engines make us a target of web ads that follow us everywhere on the web. Having compiled all the personal data like purchasing records, search queries, frequently visited websites, preferred news stories or even time spent on the site and pages skimmed through during your visit, the search engines offer a valuable resource to advertisers, who pay to be able to use it and snowball you with “targeted” ads.
  • Your search history is used for legal purposes Having a personal profile drafted at the given search engine your search history is kept on record and in case the government or a legal practitioner requires it, the search engine will immediately render the information.

How Is Unpersonalized Search Different?

  • You are not presented with a biased choice of articles that your friends have recommended.
  • Your IP is not being tracked, neither is your search history.
  • Your profile is not sold, because you simply do not have a profile when using unpersonalized search.
  • 3rd party advertisers and other parties are not able to build profiles about you in order to serve targeted ads, so your SERPs are not flooded with commercials.
  • Your Searches cannot be legally requested.

Why unpersonalized search engine like DuckDuckGo is quickly gaining popularity?

As Greg Kumparak explains DDG is still small to compare to a search engine giant like Google with its modest 1 billion searches for the year 2013. In order to make a simple comparison he draws our attention to Google’s searches for 2012 – they amount to “3.2 billion searches, or roughly 3X all of DuckDuckGo’s annual traffic, each day.” Nevertheless, DDG’s popularity marks an amazing rise for the past year and its users grow by the day. It attracts investments and partners that believe in the respect for privacy that the engine promotes by not using tracking cookies and not saving a record of its users’ IPs.

DuckDuckGo’s CEO and founder Gabriel Weinberg has openly stated that he has no interest in keeping or even collecting its visitors’ search history. Instead the search engine monetizes its services the same way Google does (showing ads triggered by the search term used) but without tracking its users.

Interesting result of this anti personalized search algorithm is the uniformity of results available to all of DDG’s users. Thus a specific search term triggers the same set of results for everyone regardless of search history and supposed interests. This provides unbiased information rendering that avoids the so-called filter bubble scenario.

Being more of a search engine aggregator DDG has a unique strategy for selecting its information sources. Unlike Google, DDG deletes the “search results for companies he believes are content mills”. Thus, while in Google’s top search results one often recognizes articles from eHow, DDG would never recommend them, as their thousands of daily posts submitted by paid freelancers are characterized as “…low-quality content designed specifically to rank highly in Google’s search index.”

The search mechanism of DDG actually aggregates the crawled results of several search engines like Bing, Yahoo, Yandex, Blekko, WolframAlpha, and many others. And while DDG does not invest time and efforts in web crawling itself, it focuses on its users’ privacy, positive experience, spam free results, and its own instant answers. It gathers the results from various sources, choosing the best vertical search engine on a given topic, while also reassembling and matching the results with the ones rendered by its private crawler –DuckDuckBot, and a number of crowd-sourced sites like Wikipedia.

DDG might just be the next step in the search industry and if it is early to be labeled as the future of search, it surely has a modern note to it that addresses the latest hot topic – about one’s right to privacy.

Nowadays the attempt to protect one’s personal information has lead to a lot of breakthroughs in technology. Take for instance how our currency has been changing throughout the recent years the modern virtual payment options like bitcoins promote lower transaction costs, immunity to inflation, and above all – anonymity. Privacy in web search is yet another rising need of the online users that alternative search engines like DuckDuckGo have proven to be able to address.

What do you guys think???

Source: http://optilocal.org/unpersonalized-search-grows-in-popularity-is-duckduckgo-the-future-of-search/

submitted by OptiLocal to SEO
[link] [9 comments]

Posted on 31 March 2014

Trying to find a photo

I've been googling around and haven't found it. I've even tried searching on blekko and duckduckgo... nothing

There's a picture with two scenarios, side by side: one where a woman has a gun and another where she does not. On the picture with the gun, she's defending herself with it. On the picture with out the gun, she has her arms up, trying to protect herself from getting beat-up. Has anyone seen this?

submitted by happycrabeatsthefish to progun
[link] [3 comments]

Posted on 25 February 2014

Help understanding a significant data discrepancy between Web Server logs & Analytics

Hey there,

I hope some of you can help with understanding a significant data discrepancy (29%) in comparing our SEO visits obtained from varnish logs vs Analytics Organic visits.

We expect there to be a sizable difference in both sets of data, as we don't know - the inner workings of analytics - our differences in dealing with pre requests, - what Google consider to be search engines - how analytics manage bot traffic & traffic that has a high percentage chance of being bot traffic

The Varnish logs are huge (millions of visits per day). So we had to initially filter these to remove known & probable bot traffic. Detecting bots is pretty difficult (though we have a long list to work from), so this is most likely one of the significant sources of extra traffic. We can assume, it's unlikely make up the full 29%.

We factored in session id's too, so that only one visit is counted per session whilst filtering out those with just one page request as these are likely to be crawlers. The next step was to identify other verticals, such as paid, mail, social, referral & server requests (particularly from email).

We then categorized referral sources we considered to be SEO:

%bahdal.com%' %baidu.com%' %blekko.com%' %duckduckgo.com%' %bablyon.com%' %snapdo.com%' %avfirm.com%' %peekyou.com%' %yandex.ru%' %search.conduit.com%' %searchmobileonline.com%' %isearch.avg.com%' %static.flipora.com%' %search.mywebsearch.com%' %google%' %bing%' %yahoo%'

(there are a few more)

Then subtracted sources which are known to not be Organic traffic:

%accounts.google.com%' %mail %' %googleads%' %/uds/afs%' %/aclk%' %cse?%' %ogskillid%' %signedparameters=%' %/vetjob?jobid%' %picture=size90%' %ogaction%' %emaillanding_invitecontact%' %medium=facebook%' %ask.com%'

(I've removed a few for the purposes of this report)

submitted by Cocopoppyhead to SEO
[link] [9 comments]

Posted on 28 November 2013

Ad-aware acting like adware- forced blekko search

Just got a new laptop for my father in law. So was getting the normal protection when noticed that Ad-aware changed my home page and keyword URL search goes through lavasoft.blekko.com . In firefox tried to change keyword URL but ever restart moves it back to the lavasoft default. Uninstalled Ad-aware and what ever fancy search bars, but it still forces me to use blekko. Why is this program acting like the programs it should be protecting us from?

submitted by chuloreddit to techsupport
[link] [1 comment]

Posted on 26 February 2013

Adaware free antiviris changed my default search engine even when I said "no" to toolbar installation.

Just a heads up... I received a prompt a few days ago to update the free version of adaware's antiviris software.

During the install, I made sure to untick the install extra toolbars and software buttons, yet when I tried to do a google search this morning, my browser's default search had been changed to blekko.

It's time for a new antiviris program.

submitted by anagrama to software
[link] [3 comments]

Posted on 29 November 2012

I think my PC might be infected

Hello,

There are several odd processes running on my PC. They have no description or username data. When I click "properties" or "open file location," nothing pops up. These are,

csrss.exe winlogon.exe atieclxx.exe 

screenshot

I realize that the former two are typical windows files and that the third is related to my ATI card, but I haven't seen these running before - or perhaps I have, but with a description and user data. I've heard that some types of malware pose as these processes.

Recently, I've noticed huge spikes in CPU usage (often reaching 100% and constant use of upwards of 50% of my computer's memory (although I have 3-4 Gb RAM, and my only memory intensive programs are Chrome / Skype / Steam). When I put my computer in sleep mode and turn it on again, sometimes the machine will turn on, the LEDs on my mouse/keyboard will turn on, the monitor remains unresponsive and the CPU light doesn't flicker. I forced shutdown once, and received a BSOD. When I rebooted, I didn't see a typical login screen - after the boot screen disappeared, the screen remained dark for 45 seconds, and suddenly showed my desktop as it was when I put my computer in sleep mode.

I've run scans in Malwarebytes, AVG and Microsoft Security Essentials in safe mode and found nothing in AVG/MSE. However, Malwarebytes found some spyware, which was deleted. However, I still notice these spikes in CPU / Memory usage, and the three processes are still listed and running. After a few searches, this seemed similar, but I haven't noticed any spam, except for Google Chrome changing my search engine from Google to Blekko -- however, this may have been a default process of one of the anti-malware softwares I've downloaded. But I am not entirely faithful that that's the case.

If you have any tips / suggestions / instructions / words of advice, I'm all ears. Thank you in advance for your help.

submitted by HideousInfant to techsupport
[link] [5 comments]

Posted on 12 February 2012